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Casino royale 2005

casino royale 2005

The "Vesper" that James Bond orders at Casino Royale is taken from the . the new James Bond was made on October 14th, , aboard the HMS President. You Know My Name ist der Titelsong zum offiziellen James-Bond-Film Casino Royale, . In: MusikWoche. Dezember , abgerufen am 3. April Finden Sie tolle Angebote für James Bond - Casino Royal (). Sicher kaufen bei eBay!.

Casino Royale 2005 Video

Casino Royale Aston Martin Rollover MPC uncredited Jason Burnett Went on and on about how much I hated it to anyone who would listen to me, too. Rene Mathis Caterina Murino And now, more random notes: She's fantastic in this movie, and I wish I was wm quali 2019 südamerika objective and appreciative of her skills as an actress. Casino Royale was released a third time on Blu-ray in with DTS audio and deleted scenes, but with less special features than the edition. In designing the credit oasis bar casino del sol for the film, graphic designer Daniel Kleinman was inspired casino royale 2005 the cover of the British first edition of Beste Spielothek in Frauenbach finden Royalewhich featured Ian Fleming's original design of a playing card bordered by eight red hearts dripping with blood. 21 nova casino seriös this Rating Title: We'll learn more about them next post. I worked in hospitality for 22 years and here's rtl online spiele take; Bond has just won the card game. Retrieved 21 November Doesn't work on a small screen; see it as big as you can. Spider-Man Were the guys in this scene wearing safety wires? Retrieved 10 December Die richtige Bewährungsprobe wird der nächste Film sein, wenn die Serie ihren Rhythmus wiederfinden muss. Ist diese Funktion hilfreich? Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Damit hatte Fleming nur noch mittelbar zu tun. Angela Merkel beim Deutschlandtag: Übersetzt von Günther Eichel. Fleming flicht dessen free deposit casino 2019 Kriegserlebnisse immer wieder ein. Ich war bereits als jaehriges Maedchen von diesem Buch fasziniert. The Ford Mondeo sport model used in the beginning of the film is a special, one-off hand-built prototype vehicle, constructed by hand at Ford of Europe's Design Beste Spielothek in Kleincotta finden in Cologne, Germany, in January, Er bietet online casino vegas cleopatra slots free play viel Action und hat eine coole Story. DVD Okt 20, "Bitte wiederholen".

Redirected from Casino Royale soundtrack. Archived from the original on Eon films secondary songs Non-Eon films secondary songs. Le Chiffre Vesper Lynd.

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Original Motion Picture Soundtrack Die Another Day But I don't think Don's slight James Bondiness is a coincidence at all; I think that given his slightly mysterious veneer and his drinking and his womanizing, there is no way on Earth they didn't have on the brain at least a bit.

I'd seen his name in the credits, but the pun never caught my attention! I will definitely check your post out.

Thanks for sharing it! Oh, I remembered one more thing. About the scene in the empty restaurant. I worked in hospitality for 22 years and here's my take; Bond has just won the card game.

It's late at night, if not the wee small hours. Since Bond is now an honoured guest, they opened up the restaurant and let him have a table.

From memory, he's snacking on crackers and caviar, which would be a simple case of a staff member opening up a can and a packet of biscuits.

There's no actual cooking involved, so a chef who probably finished his shift hours ago is not required to prepare anything.

I base this assumption on numerous instances where I had to bring guests some kind of snack after the hotel kitchens had closed.

The steam arm on a cappuccino machine can scramble three eggs in about fifteen seconds. One of my colleagues told me you could cook a steak with a clothes iron, if necessary.

He was speaking from experience. Hotels have those small irons in every room and I'm sure they would have spares too. So personally, I don't think Bond bought the place out, as stated on the commentary.

Which leads me to think that the screenwriters did their homework or wrote that scene based on some research into the inner workings of hotels and hungry guests at 3: Bond girls- wise, Casino Royale is so far the first and only Bond film in which none of them survive the movie.

But it does featured women in lesser parts which would have been portrayed only by men in earlier Bond films. Thursday, March 12, Casino Royale [].

The second series of James Bond films began in with the release of tonight's subject, Casino Royale. The first series of Bond films ended with Die Another Day , the twentieth entry.

The consensus on that film seemed to be that it had -- like Moonraker before it -- gone much too far into the realm of science fiction; a return to the grounded approach to Bond was in order.

It was a fair assessment, and the series had proven to be capable of recalibrating in that fashion with For Your Eyes Only two decades previously.

This time, though, the producers decided to not just tap the reset button, but to go to the breaker box and turn everything off.

All the way off. It is easy to overlook how risky a move this was. Whatever one's personal opinion of Die Another Day may be and it is reviled by many Bond fans , it is impossible to deny that that movie had been a massive success.

It was easily the biggest hit of the Pierce Brosnan era, which had begun in strong financial fashion with GoldenEye and then progressed steadily in the seven subsequent years.

Under Brosnan, the series had returned to the heights that it had arguably lost from the mid-eighties to the mid-nineties; the series, and the character, were on top again.

By all rules of common sense, the right move for Barbara Broccoli and Michael G. Wilson would have been to make a fifth movie with Brosnan, and then a sixth, and probably a seventh after that.

Instead, they sensed that complacency was at hand, and in order to prevent it from taking over and miring the series in hypothetical irrelevance, they decided to start the series over from the ground up.

Brosnan was thanked for his service one hopes and shown the door. The clock was reset to zero, and -- the rights to Ian Fleming's first novel having finally been obtained -- the quasi origin story Casino Royale was undertaken.

Allow me to briefly address an idea which has found occasional support among alleged Bond fans: In this scenario, Daniel Craig is simply the newest such agent.

Two films later, Skyfall will make it a literal fact that Bond's birth name is Bond, by the way, but that won't happen for six years from tonight's vantage point.

This is a different M being played by the same actor; there is no need to read more into it than that, nor is there cause to do so. I mention all that because if you buy into the codename notion, then you might object to the idea that Casino Royale launched a second Bond series.

Eventually, I will write a post that tackles the idea of Bond continuity head-on, but the short version is: If you object to that assertion on the ground that opinions cannot be incorrect, then allow me to assure you that it is not an opinion you are espousing; it is an incorrect assertion, based on a shallow and imprecise reading of the films specifically and the larger context of Bond generally.

We won't have any of your bullshit around here. And on that note of grumpiness, I think we are primed and ready to dive into the Daniel Craig era of Bond films.

It was taken as a given for a long time -- roughly from -- that not only was Sean Connery the best James Bond, but that he would remain the best James Bond until at least the sounding of Gideon's trumpet.

From the moment Casino Royale opened in November of , however, it was clear that the matter had unexpectedly been opened for discussion again.

I enjoy providing a bit of historical perspective at the beginnings of these posts, but it is not my aim to serve as a recap of such events.

Nevertheless, it's worth remembering that when Daniel Craig was announced as the new Bond, a lot of alleged Bond fans lost their shit.

You will note that that is the second time this post I have used the phrase "alleged Bond fans. A lot of people simply couldn't cope with the idea that James Bond might be played by a guy with blond hair.

I shit you not, folks; if you don't remember, the phrase "James Blond" was an actual thing for a while there. A website called danielcraigisnotbond.

Everyone else was open-minded, and reserved judgment. Except for a relatively small informed faction of us who had seen Craig in movies like Munich and Layer Cake and knew he was going to be great.

I will admit that even I thought he was going to have to dye his hair, though. If you sense a note of self-congratulation in all of that, guess what?

I mention this as an example of why you should listen to me: Not always, or even often; but occasionally. So keep listening, and you're boudn to get an honest-to-goodness, bona fide insight every once in a while.

Even I didn't know he was going to be as awesome as he's turned out to be, though. From his first scene on, Craig's Bond seems like somebody who could genuinely murder somebody when and if the need arose for him to do so.

Connery had that, too; Dalton and Lazenby could sort of feign toward it, Brosnan could mime it, Moore could lampoon it. Craig has it in abundance, and while there is a debate to be had over whether that is an integral element of the Fleming novels, there is no debate to be had over whether it is an integral element of the first four or so films in the series.

I mean, if you want to debate it, go right ahead; I'm not going to show up for it, though, because I assume I won the moment the premise was stated.

But if you want to have a debate, go right ahead; there's a whole website for you to visit that will pat you on the back in congratulation. Craig's physical ability and presence is a key element in the shift in tone this second series takes in order to steer away from where the first series ended.

If you've been reading these posts as they've appeared, then you know one of my big problems with the middle Brosnan movies is that they have a serious inconsistency of tone; they wanted to be capable of probing character psychology AND cars driven from the backseat via remote control.

It didn't work; Elektra King and Christmas Jones can't be in the same movie without both failing. It comes down to a simple desire: It's a desire I can understand.

The question is, how do you actually do that? The answer is not particularly hard to find: You don't do it by injecting tragedy into a comedy. Shakespeare knew this; you didn't see him trying to make the audience cry during Much Ado About Nothing.

You did, however, find him trying -- and succeeding -- to make audiences laugh during Hamlet , King Lear , Macbeth , etc. All lives are tragedies, after all; and even the saddest life contains the potential for laughter.

You might think the opposite would hold true, but I find that most comedies are best-advised to focus on being funny; rarely can a comedy actually summon pathos without becoming serious enough that it it becomes, in effect, a drama.

Examples might include Annie Hall and Dr. Hence, in order for the Bond films to be capable of doing everything, they had to get serious again.

The world had gotten serious again; why should the Bond films not follow suit? It may be, however, that one's personal idea of what a Bond movie should be can't allow for Daniel Craig.

If so, fair enough. I think it's a take on Bond that is very far from my own, but can I squint mentally and get there for a moment or two? In that light, maybe something like Casino Royale is a failure.

For my money, though, it's a return to form for the series; it's a throwback to the days when something like From Russia with Love or Thunderball might have been taken at least semi-seriously.

This is that, amplified somewhat; nothing more, nothing less. It's been refocused to fit , but otherwise, this is the same old Bond we've had since the novel was released in Let's try to course-correct by talking about a few specific scenes.

I've already alluded to the opening scene, in which we see Bond earn his double-0 status by carrying out two sanctioned assassinations.

The scene is composed of two parts: Not since George Lazenby in have we seen Bond in this intense a fistfight. It's high-impact, brutal stuff, and Craig does just as well as his stunt double in convincing us that what we're seeing is real.

Just as important, however, is the other part of the scene: It's important for us to believe that Bond will always have the upper hand in a fight, but it's just as important for us to believe that he'll always have the upper hand in a conversation.

If there are two men in a room, and one of them is James Bond, James Bond must seem to be the better man by virtue of the way he comports himself in relation to the second man.

Occasional exceptions can be made, if the second man is friendly and has some sort of specialization; but generally speaking, the Bond card must trump all others.

And so it does when it's Bond vs. Dryden attempts to maintain the conversational upper hand by handing down wisdom to Bond.

Not well," replies Bond. Dryden plays analyst for a moment and hypothesizes about the extent to which Bond's victim made him "feel" the death i.

One assumes he is about to say "easier," but Bond doesn't give him the chance; he pulls out a gun and shoots Dryden dead as dead can be.

If you watch the scene, Dryden clearly believes he had a chance of talking Bond out of doing what he'd been sent there to do; if you watch the scene, you believe Dryden never had a chance.

This version of Bond was never going to do anything other than put a bullet in Dryden's brain, and watching Craig during these moments is a bit like watching a snake as it considers the mouse which has just been dropped into its cage.

There is only one scenario. If you like for your James Bond to be a believable assassin, then this scene can only thrill you. After the opening credits which we will obviously discuss in greater detail later on , we get a scene in which Bond chases a bomber through Madagascar.

It's a great scene; the bomber, Mollaka, runs nimbly up steel girders and bounds over fences and whatnot like he's friggin' Spider-Man or something.

Bond, meanwhile, can only plod determinedly after him; but even when confronted with a foe whose specific physical skills vastly outstrip his own, he see that Bond retains the upper hand by focusing on doing what he can do well.

The two best moments Bond has during this sequence are probably 1 when he runs straight through some drywall to keep the chase going and 2 this:.

As Bondian moments of badassery go, that ranks high on the list. As does Bond running through the wall, but sadly, that moment doesn't screencap all that well, and therefore will not be visually represented here.

All sorts of goodness when Bond arrives in the Bahamas, including the scene in which he purposely wrecks the Germans' car after they mistake him for a valet.

Just before that happens, we have a momentary flirtation between Bond and a couple of babes passing by on their way for some tennis. In another Bond film, this would have led to intercourse, but this, sadly for Bond, is Casino Royale.

I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the scene in which Bond emerges from the sea, wearing only his swim trunks.

One gathers that for those whose sexual preferences run to the masculine, this scene was nearly as big a deal as the Ursula Andress or Halle Berry scenes were for the rest of us.

I'd remembered this being more of a full-body shot, the way it was for Andress and Berry; but, no, it's coyer than that.

That seems unfair, and so I give this to those of you who will enjoy it:. Everyone else, fret not: Another highlight comes when Bond, introducing himself to Solange in the form of propositioning her, offers to take her to his nearby home for drinks.

They take the car from the valet, drive in a circle around the exit and back to the entrance of the hotel, and are greeted by the unflappable valet.

Do you buy this as a moment that would, in essence, charm the panties off a lady? I suspect it is reasonably realistic. Prince knows what I'm sayin'.

This is one of the relatively few moments in which Craig is fishin' fishing for a laugh in the movie, but it's not the only one.

He's got a few subtly funny reaction shots such as a look of semi-desbelief when he successfully brings the gasoline tanker to a stop in front of the airplane , for example.

And his biggest one-liner -- "That last hand nearly killed me," he quips after barely avoiding death via poison -- is quite successful.

He's also good at getting a laugh by being serious in a way that allows the audience to wink at themselves as in the "Do I look like I give a dman?

The biggest laugh for his Bond over three movies probably comes here when Vesper resuscitates him, and he asks her if she's okay; his reactions to her reaction are pretty great.

I could write and write and write about scenes of Craig being great, but let's restrict ourselves to just a few more. Craig is very subtle during the scene where he views Solange's corpse.

He initially looks stone-cold, but allows a momentary regret to barely register. Moments like this are a good reason why cinema should be viewed on a large screen or at least up close ; such a moment is lost on a small screen.

During the course of this scene, M asks, "I would ask you if you could remain emotionally detached; but I don't think that's your problem, is it, Bond?

Looking at himself in the mirror after the stairwell fight, Craig is getting to do the sort of scene one suspects Brosnan would have killed to be able do.

I don't think Brosnan would have been AS well-suited for it as Craig is, but I think he would have done fine.

The difference is that Casino Royale is, from top to bottom, the sort of film that permits for even encourages a scene like that one; not so much with Tomorrow Never Dies.

One feels even sorrier for Brosnan in retrospect. The much-ballyhooed torture scene is another good one to use as a mental exercise for comparing Bond actors.

I honestly can't imagine any of the others pulling this scene off. I would love to eventually do a post wherein I rank all the times Bond says "Bond Without a doubt, Connery's in Dr.

No will rank 1 in that post, but I suspect this one from Casino Royale would be a strong 2. Is this THE best performance an actor has given as Bond?

If not, it's damn close. Daniel Craig is not Bond? As has occasionally been the case with these posts before, it would be possible to debate who should be considered to be the main villain.

However, that's more of a flaw with my ranking system than it is an actual problem of any other sort; as I've used it in the past, a case could be made for Mr.

White being considered, but the hell with that, we're definitely going to put Le Chiffre in that spot for our purposes here. Le Chiffre was the original Ian Fleming villain, and his appearance here marks the first time a Fleming baddie had appeared in one of the films since 's Never Say Never Again.

Quite a gap, that. I don't have a huge amount to say about Le Chiffre, or about Mads Mikkelsen's performance. Both are among the best examples of their type in the Bond series, period.

When one thinks about James Bond henchmen, one tends to think of colorful characters like Oddjob, Jaws, Xenia, or yes Zao.

Bigger than life, somewhat silly, a little more entertaining than murderers should maybe be. It's okay; it's a cartoon world, in a sense, so cartoonish baddies are acceptable.

Casino Royale is obviously a different sort of James Bond film; a purer sort, one might argue although I'd argue that it's less a case of this one being pure than of the others being diluted; semantics.

Therefore, you couldn't just drop Grace Jones into this movie as May Day and have that be a thing that would work.

So instead, what Casino Royale has is a long list of secondary baddies, some of whom are henchmen, some of whom are of a different breed altogether.

Let's look at them one at a time: Dryden, the subject of Bond's second assassination. He's obviously a guy who is used to getting away with breaking the law and betraying his country.

White, the representative of the unnamed group backing Le Chiffre. He's a very ordinary-looking guy, and that's part of what makes him seem dangerous; the intent of his group is seemingly that they are perfectly blended into the shadows, and with a guy like this, you can totally believe it.

This is Obanno, the Ugandan warlord whose money Le Chiffre is supposed to be protecting. I like Obanno a lot; it's not every guy who can pull off an orange dress shirt.

I wish he'd had a larger role, somehow. Obanno is played by Isaach De Bankole, who was in several episodes of season seven of In what is arguably a nod toward cartoonishness, Mollaka -- the bombmaker Bond pursues in Madagascar -- has burn scars on his face and hands.

He's also got that superhuman ability to parkour his way out of a jam. Mollaka is played by Sebastien Foucan, who is one of the co-founders of parkour; so if you're wondering why all the parkour, that's why.

Also, if you're wondering that: Is Valenka a henchman or Bond girl? Depends on your viewpoint, I guess, but since Bond never even talks to her, I think she's got to count as a henchman.

She's hot AND she's cool, but she has very little to do in this movie. She's played by Ivana Milicevic, whom was known to me at the time best as Riley's wife on that one episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

She's been plugging away at her career for years, and currently is one of the leads on the series Banshee , which is supposedly pretty good.

This is Dimitrios, who is a real sourpuss, despite being married to Caterina Murino. He's not my favorite baddie in the movie; he might be my least favorite.

He's my least favorite. He does almost literally nothing the entire movie except be there in the background. Le Chiffre does, however, put him in charge of cutting the seat out of the chair that he plops naked Bond into; and Kratt does that like a boss.

Carlos, the substitute bomber. He is obviously very competent; you believe that he would be a match for Bond both mentally and physically, even if it does blow up in his face ultimately.

He also has that ability to blend in, which is important for the realism this new series is striving for. This is Gettler, who obviously works for the same company Mr.

We'll learn more about them next post. The one-eye thing is another nod toward cartoon-type iconography, but it's restrained in such a way as to keep it grounded.

By the way, if this screencap looks a bit lower in quality than the others, it's because I forgot to screencap Gettler myself and then was too lazy to go back and do it, so I found one online instead.

I doubt you care, but just in case, there's your explanation! None of them pop for me, except for Obanna. But the movie works as well as it works partially because they each work as well as they work, and that ain't nothin'.

After rewatching Casino Royale I have decided that that is still true, but only by the slenderest of margins; Vesper in Casino Royale is breathing down her neck.

Part of me wonders if that means that I only value Bond girls if they end up dead. I don't think that's the case; I'm also a big fan of Tatiana and Domino, and neither of them get killed.

Instead, I think that what appeals to me most about a Bond girl is a sense of intelligence and self-determination. Domino doesn't quite fit that bill as ably as the others I've mentioned do, but she gets close enough.

Combine that with being devastatingly attractive, and you've got good odds of being in the hunt for the upper echelons of Bond-girldom.

Such is my lot in life, I suppose. Anyways, here come some prime ogling opportunities for you, all courtesy of the book Bond On Set: Total points awarded The Bond Girls: There are numerous Bond films battling it out for the title of "best action scenes ever," but Casino Royale is right in there that fight with 'em all.

If you pressed me, I think I'd say that my favorite action scenes and stunts come in Live and Let Die ; the boat chase is just awesome, and the run across the crocs gators?

From there, you've got the underwater action of Thunderball , the ski scenes in Majesty's , the ski jump in The Spy Who Loved Me, the aerial jumps in Moonraker.

I can't honestly say that the action scenes and stuntwork of Casino Royale is superior to those movies, but at the same time I find it impossible to say it's inferior.

So, a partial list of this movie's action-scene goodies: Did I forget anything? Let's look at a few screencaps, then I've got some summary thoughts: Spider-Man Were the guys in this scene wearing safety wires?

Were said wires removed via CGI? This sequence is still phenomenal. The movie was edited by Stuart "director of Star Trek: Nemesis " Baird, and the editing is mostly terrific.

There are numerous examples of the editing working like gangbusters, but, as usual, I failed to note any of them.

Also, when he does a two-part leap to go several stories down and across the building: Vesper's various outfits are smashing, obviously, but everyone looks great in this movie.

I think I think this might be the best set of costumes in the history of the series. Probably should have taken more screencaps to illustrate that, but such is life.

I didn't do a particularly good job of screencapping this movie's sumptuous locations, either, sadly. But they are strong, and include: And now, Random Thoughts, with Bryant Burnette: Carter, the agent who can't keep his hand off his ear, ain't much of a spy; he's never going to make double This version of M is much more interesting than the previous one, despite being played by the same actor.

Judi Dench is visibly elevated by playing against Daniel Craig, which is a statement that probably bums Pierce Brosnan out. But that's not a knock on Brosnan; his scenes with Dench were invariably among the highlights of his Bond movies.

No, it's just a recognition of the fact that this screenplay actually had something for M to do, as opposed to making crap up for M to do simply because they couldn't stand to waste Judi Dench.

For my money, this is up to far and away the best use of M in any Bond movie. M's assistant, Villiers, seems to be a sort of proto-Moneypenny. He's played by Tobias Mezies, who you might know from good roles in Rome and Outlander.

I primarily think of him as one of the few survivors of the Red Wedding on Game of Thrones , though. I like Menzies, and it's a shame Villiers is only in the one Bond film.

Martin Campbell, with Casino Royale , became arguably the second or, at the least, third most important and influential director in Bond series history.

He'd already done a fantastic job at a key moment in the series' history with GoldenEye , but his work here is even more impressive. But if Campbell had not done as strong a job as he did behind the camera, the efforts of everyone else might have been for naught.

And vice versa, of course; film is a collaborative medium, and rarely does the auteur theory actually hold true.

It certainly wouldn't be appropriate here. Nevertheless, Campbell's consistency of tone, his vision, and his skill with actors took what could have been iffy and helped it become a bit of a masterpiece.

And now, more random notes: The intent of the opening sequence being in black and white seems to have been for it to remind us of a bygone era, specifically of the era in which Bond himself came into being.

But either way, I think it works; if nothing else, it signals the longtime Bond viewer that something has changed.

Speaking of changes, the gunbarrel sequence not appearing at the beginning of the film proved to be a somewhat controversial decision.

However, the way Campbell uses it here is perfect. So no complaints from me! I love many individual shots hence the plethora of screencaps in this post , but one of my favorites is the overhead shot of Mollaka running away on the ground while Bond pursues him on rooftop as their chase scene begins.

Doesn't work on a small screen; see it as big as you can. You've seen plenty of examples of Phil Meheux's exemplary cinematography throughout this post; no real need for me to say much here, is there?

I think Thunderball is slightly better thanks to the stunning underwater sequences; but otherwise, this is about as good as Bond movies can look.

At least as of The production design here is courtesy of Peter Lamont, who seemingly retired afterward.

Czech Republic Andrew Noakes Czech Republic Anthony Waye Czech Republic Mark Harrison Czech Republic Andy Madden Czech Republic Alexander Witt Dolby film sound Oliver Tarney Czech Republic John Schoonraad Czech Republic Andrew Warner Peerless Camera Company Ben Baker Peerless Camera Co Steven Begg Peerless Camera Company Andrew Booth Peerless Camera Company James Breen Peerless Camera Company Chas Cash Peerless as Martin Davison Paul Denhard Peerless Clare Johanna Downie Peerless Camera Company Paul Driver Double Negative Walter Gilbert Double Negative Adam Glasman Cinesite as Venetia Penna Ed Hall Double Negative Laurence Harvey Peerless Camera Company Garrett Honn Double Negative Sevendalino Khay Peerless Camera Company Diane Kingston Peerless Camera Co Luca Lachin Double Negative Mitch Mitchell Peerless as Tim Olive Bill Pearson Peerless Camera Company Mark Robben Peerless Camera Company Aled Robinson Peerless Camera Co James Russell Peerless Camera Company Mark Spevick Peerless Camera Co Emeline Tedder Cinesite uncredited Graham Bell MPC uncredited Jason Burnett Fuzzygoat Ltd uncredited Paul Doogan Cinesite uncredited Caroline Garrett Fuzzygoat Ltd uncredited Joe Godfrey Peerless uncredited Adam Hawkes Plowman Craven and Associates uncredited Taz Lodder Double Negative uncredited Kevin Lowery Framestore uncredited Pedro Sabrosa If so, fair enough.

I think it's a take on Bond that is very far from my own, but can I squint mentally and get there for a moment or two?

In that light, maybe something like Casino Royale is a failure. For my money, though, it's a return to form for the series; it's a throwback to the days when something like From Russia with Love or Thunderball might have been taken at least semi-seriously.

This is that, amplified somewhat; nothing more, nothing less. It's been refocused to fit , but otherwise, this is the same old Bond we've had since the novel was released in Let's try to course-correct by talking about a few specific scenes.

I've already alluded to the opening scene, in which we see Bond earn his double-0 status by carrying out two sanctioned assassinations.

The scene is composed of two parts: Not since George Lazenby in have we seen Bond in this intense a fistfight.

It's high-impact, brutal stuff, and Craig does just as well as his stunt double in convincing us that what we're seeing is real. Just as important, however, is the other part of the scene: It's important for us to believe that Bond will always have the upper hand in a fight, but it's just as important for us to believe that he'll always have the upper hand in a conversation.

If there are two men in a room, and one of them is James Bond, James Bond must seem to be the better man by virtue of the way he comports himself in relation to the second man.

Occasional exceptions can be made, if the second man is friendly and has some sort of specialization; but generally speaking, the Bond card must trump all others.

And so it does when it's Bond vs. Dryden attempts to maintain the conversational upper hand by handing down wisdom to Bond.

Not well," replies Bond. Dryden plays analyst for a moment and hypothesizes about the extent to which Bond's victim made him "feel" the death i.

One assumes he is about to say "easier," but Bond doesn't give him the chance; he pulls out a gun and shoots Dryden dead as dead can be.

If you watch the scene, Dryden clearly believes he had a chance of talking Bond out of doing what he'd been sent there to do; if you watch the scene, you believe Dryden never had a chance.

This version of Bond was never going to do anything other than put a bullet in Dryden's brain, and watching Craig during these moments is a bit like watching a snake as it considers the mouse which has just been dropped into its cage.

There is only one scenario. If you like for your James Bond to be a believable assassin, then this scene can only thrill you. After the opening credits which we will obviously discuss in greater detail later on , we get a scene in which Bond chases a bomber through Madagascar.

It's a great scene; the bomber, Mollaka, runs nimbly up steel girders and bounds over fences and whatnot like he's friggin' Spider-Man or something.

Bond, meanwhile, can only plod determinedly after him; but even when confronted with a foe whose specific physical skills vastly outstrip his own, he see that Bond retains the upper hand by focusing on doing what he can do well.

The two best moments Bond has during this sequence are probably 1 when he runs straight through some drywall to keep the chase going and 2 this:.

As Bondian moments of badassery go, that ranks high on the list. As does Bond running through the wall, but sadly, that moment doesn't screencap all that well, and therefore will not be visually represented here.

All sorts of goodness when Bond arrives in the Bahamas, including the scene in which he purposely wrecks the Germans' car after they mistake him for a valet.

Just before that happens, we have a momentary flirtation between Bond and a couple of babes passing by on their way for some tennis.

In another Bond film, this would have led to intercourse, but this, sadly for Bond, is Casino Royale. I'd be remiss if I didn't mention the scene in which Bond emerges from the sea, wearing only his swim trunks.

One gathers that for those whose sexual preferences run to the masculine, this scene was nearly as big a deal as the Ursula Andress or Halle Berry scenes were for the rest of us.

I'd remembered this being more of a full-body shot, the way it was for Andress and Berry; but, no, it's coyer than that.

That seems unfair, and so I give this to those of you who will enjoy it:. Everyone else, fret not: Another highlight comes when Bond, introducing himself to Solange in the form of propositioning her, offers to take her to his nearby home for drinks.

They take the car from the valet, drive in a circle around the exit and back to the entrance of the hotel, and are greeted by the unflappable valet.

Do you buy this as a moment that would, in essence, charm the panties off a lady? I suspect it is reasonably realistic. Prince knows what I'm sayin'.

This is one of the relatively few moments in which Craig is fishin' fishing for a laugh in the movie, but it's not the only one. He's got a few subtly funny reaction shots such as a look of semi-desbelief when he successfully brings the gasoline tanker to a stop in front of the airplane , for example.

And his biggest one-liner -- "That last hand nearly killed me," he quips after barely avoiding death via poison -- is quite successful.

He's also good at getting a laugh by being serious in a way that allows the audience to wink at themselves as in the "Do I look like I give a dman?

The biggest laugh for his Bond over three movies probably comes here when Vesper resuscitates him, and he asks her if she's okay; his reactions to her reaction are pretty great.

I could write and write and write about scenes of Craig being great, but let's restrict ourselves to just a few more. Craig is very subtle during the scene where he views Solange's corpse.

He initially looks stone-cold, but allows a momentary regret to barely register. Moments like this are a good reason why cinema should be viewed on a large screen or at least up close ; such a moment is lost on a small screen.

During the course of this scene, M asks, "I would ask you if you could remain emotionally detached; but I don't think that's your problem, is it, Bond?

Looking at himself in the mirror after the stairwell fight, Craig is getting to do the sort of scene one suspects Brosnan would have killed to be able do.

I don't think Brosnan would have been AS well-suited for it as Craig is, but I think he would have done fine. The difference is that Casino Royale is, from top to bottom, the sort of film that permits for even encourages a scene like that one; not so much with Tomorrow Never Dies.

One feels even sorrier for Brosnan in retrospect. The much-ballyhooed torture scene is another good one to use as a mental exercise for comparing Bond actors.

I honestly can't imagine any of the others pulling this scene off. I would love to eventually do a post wherein I rank all the times Bond says "Bond Without a doubt, Connery's in Dr.

No will rank 1 in that post, but I suspect this one from Casino Royale would be a strong 2. Is this THE best performance an actor has given as Bond?

If not, it's damn close. Daniel Craig is not Bond? As has occasionally been the case with these posts before, it would be possible to debate who should be considered to be the main villain.

However, that's more of a flaw with my ranking system than it is an actual problem of any other sort; as I've used it in the past, a case could be made for Mr.

White being considered, but the hell with that, we're definitely going to put Le Chiffre in that spot for our purposes here. Le Chiffre was the original Ian Fleming villain, and his appearance here marks the first time a Fleming baddie had appeared in one of the films since 's Never Say Never Again.

Quite a gap, that. I don't have a huge amount to say about Le Chiffre, or about Mads Mikkelsen's performance.

Both are among the best examples of their type in the Bond series, period. When one thinks about James Bond henchmen, one tends to think of colorful characters like Oddjob, Jaws, Xenia, or yes Zao.

Bigger than life, somewhat silly, a little more entertaining than murderers should maybe be. It's okay; it's a cartoon world, in a sense, so cartoonish baddies are acceptable.

Casino Royale is obviously a different sort of James Bond film; a purer sort, one might argue although I'd argue that it's less a case of this one being pure than of the others being diluted; semantics.

Therefore, you couldn't just drop Grace Jones into this movie as May Day and have that be a thing that would work. So instead, what Casino Royale has is a long list of secondary baddies, some of whom are henchmen, some of whom are of a different breed altogether.

Let's look at them one at a time: Dryden, the subject of Bond's second assassination. He's obviously a guy who is used to getting away with breaking the law and betraying his country.

White, the representative of the unnamed group backing Le Chiffre. He's a very ordinary-looking guy, and that's part of what makes him seem dangerous; the intent of his group is seemingly that they are perfectly blended into the shadows, and with a guy like this, you can totally believe it.

This is Obanno, the Ugandan warlord whose money Le Chiffre is supposed to be protecting. I like Obanno a lot; it's not every guy who can pull off an orange dress shirt.

I wish he'd had a larger role, somehow. Obanno is played by Isaach De Bankole, who was in several episodes of season seven of In what is arguably a nod toward cartoonishness, Mollaka -- the bombmaker Bond pursues in Madagascar -- has burn scars on his face and hands.

He's also got that superhuman ability to parkour his way out of a jam. Mollaka is played by Sebastien Foucan, who is one of the co-founders of parkour; so if you're wondering why all the parkour, that's why.

Also, if you're wondering that: Is Valenka a henchman or Bond girl? Depends on your viewpoint, I guess, but since Bond never even talks to her, I think she's got to count as a henchman.

She's hot AND she's cool, but she has very little to do in this movie. She's played by Ivana Milicevic, whom was known to me at the time best as Riley's wife on that one episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

She's been plugging away at her career for years, and currently is one of the leads on the series Banshee , which is supposedly pretty good.

This is Dimitrios, who is a real sourpuss, despite being married to Caterina Murino. He's not my favorite baddie in the movie; he might be my least favorite.

He's my least favorite. He does almost literally nothing the entire movie except be there in the background. Le Chiffre does, however, put him in charge of cutting the seat out of the chair that he plops naked Bond into; and Kratt does that like a boss.

Carlos, the substitute bomber. He is obviously very competent; you believe that he would be a match for Bond both mentally and physically, even if it does blow up in his face ultimately.

He also has that ability to blend in, which is important for the realism this new series is striving for. This is Gettler, who obviously works for the same company Mr.

We'll learn more about them next post. The one-eye thing is another nod toward cartoon-type iconography, but it's restrained in such a way as to keep it grounded.

By the way, if this screencap looks a bit lower in quality than the others, it's because I forgot to screencap Gettler myself and then was too lazy to go back and do it, so I found one online instead.

I doubt you care, but just in case, there's your explanation! None of them pop for me, except for Obanna.

But the movie works as well as it works partially because they each work as well as they work, and that ain't nothin'. After rewatching Casino Royale I have decided that that is still true, but only by the slenderest of margins; Vesper in Casino Royale is breathing down her neck.

Part of me wonders if that means that I only value Bond girls if they end up dead. I don't think that's the case; I'm also a big fan of Tatiana and Domino, and neither of them get killed.

Instead, I think that what appeals to me most about a Bond girl is a sense of intelligence and self-determination.

Domino doesn't quite fit that bill as ably as the others I've mentioned do, but she gets close enough. Combine that with being devastatingly attractive, and you've got good odds of being in the hunt for the upper echelons of Bond-girldom.

Such is my lot in life, I suppose. Anyways, here come some prime ogling opportunities for you, all courtesy of the book Bond On Set: Total points awarded The Bond Girls: There are numerous Bond films battling it out for the title of "best action scenes ever," but Casino Royale is right in there that fight with 'em all.

If you pressed me, I think I'd say that my favorite action scenes and stunts come in Live and Let Die ; the boat chase is just awesome, and the run across the crocs gators?

From there, you've got the underwater action of Thunderball , the ski scenes in Majesty's , the ski jump in The Spy Who Loved Me, the aerial jumps in Moonraker.

I can't honestly say that the action scenes and stuntwork of Casino Royale is superior to those movies, but at the same time I find it impossible to say it's inferior.

So, a partial list of this movie's action-scene goodies: Did I forget anything? Let's look at a few screencaps, then I've got some summary thoughts: Spider-Man Were the guys in this scene wearing safety wires?

Were said wires removed via CGI? This sequence is still phenomenal. The movie was edited by Stuart "director of Star Trek: Nemesis " Baird, and the editing is mostly terrific.

There are numerous examples of the editing working like gangbusters, but, as usual, I failed to note any of them.

Also, when he does a two-part leap to go several stories down and across the building: Vesper's various outfits are smashing, obviously, but everyone looks great in this movie.

I think I think this might be the best set of costumes in the history of the series. Probably should have taken more screencaps to illustrate that, but such is life.

I didn't do a particularly good job of screencapping this movie's sumptuous locations, either, sadly.

But they are strong, and include: And now, Random Thoughts, with Bryant Burnette: Carter, the agent who can't keep his hand off his ear, ain't much of a spy; he's never going to make double This version of M is much more interesting than the previous one, despite being played by the same actor.

Judi Dench is visibly elevated by playing against Daniel Craig, which is a statement that probably bums Pierce Brosnan out. But that's not a knock on Brosnan; his scenes with Dench were invariably among the highlights of his Bond movies.

No, it's just a recognition of the fact that this screenplay actually had something for M to do, as opposed to making crap up for M to do simply because they couldn't stand to waste Judi Dench.

For my money, this is up to far and away the best use of M in any Bond movie. M's assistant, Villiers, seems to be a sort of proto-Moneypenny.

He's played by Tobias Mezies, who you might know from good roles in Rome and Outlander. I primarily think of him as one of the few survivors of the Red Wedding on Game of Thrones , though.

I like Menzies, and it's a shame Villiers is only in the one Bond film. Martin Campbell, with Casino Royale , became arguably the second or, at the least, third most important and influential director in Bond series history.

He'd already done a fantastic job at a key moment in the series' history with GoldenEye , but his work here is even more impressive.

But if Campbell had not done as strong a job as he did behind the camera, the efforts of everyone else might have been for naught. And vice versa, of course; film is a collaborative medium, and rarely does the auteur theory actually hold true.

It certainly wouldn't be appropriate here. Nevertheless, Campbell's consistency of tone, his vision, and his skill with actors took what could have been iffy and helped it become a bit of a masterpiece.

And now, more random notes: The intent of the opening sequence being in black and white seems to have been for it to remind us of a bygone era, specifically of the era in which Bond himself came into being.

But either way, I think it works; if nothing else, it signals the longtime Bond viewer that something has changed. Speaking of changes, the gunbarrel sequence not appearing at the beginning of the film proved to be a somewhat controversial decision.

However, the way Campbell uses it here is perfect. So no complaints from me! I love many individual shots hence the plethora of screencaps in this post , but one of my favorites is the overhead shot of Mollaka running away on the ground while Bond pursues him on rooftop as their chase scene begins.

Doesn't work on a small screen; see it as big as you can. You've seen plenty of examples of Phil Meheux's exemplary cinematography throughout this post; no real need for me to say much here, is there?

I think Thunderball is slightly better thanks to the stunning underwater sequences; but otherwise, this is about as good as Bond movies can look.

James Bond", on the official album. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Casino Royale soundtrack.

Archived from the original on Eon films secondary songs Non-Eon films secondary songs. Le Chiffre Vesper Lynd. Casino Royale film. Retrieved from " https: Soundtrack albums from James Bond films Casino Royale film soundtracks.

Instead, they sensed that complacency was at hand, and in order to prevent it from taking over and miring the series in hypothetical irrelevance, they decided to start the series over from the ground up. Under Brosnan, the series had returned to the heights that it had arguably lost from the mid-eighties to the mid-nineties; the series, and the character, were on top again. Double Negative Mitch Mitchell I don't think Brosnan would have ps4 spiele top 100 AS well-suited for it as Craig is, but I think he would have done fine. And Jeffrey Wright is the best Felix Leiter. Le Chiffre Judi Dench And the movie uses them quite well, too. He's Beste Spielothek in Bad Ragaz finden least favorite. For what it's worth, my friend's wife's other remark that Casino royale 2005 new online casinos 2019 with no deposit bonus from that evening she objected to Eva Green as Vesper Lynd game of thrones casino that a Bond Girl had to be as stunning as the girls from Thunderball or what's the point. Retrieved 5 March A recreation of the Body Worlds exhibit provided a setting for one scene in the film. Hermitage Waiter Rest of cast listed alphabetically: I think he would have been fantastic; although, again, I'm certainly happy they went with Craig and would in no way want to fly casino that. Instead, I think that energy casino promo kod 2019 appeals to me most about a Bond girl is a sense of intelligence and self-determination. Nemesis " Baird, and the editing is mostly terrific.

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Er hat starke Akzente gesetzt, hat bisweilen überzogen, aber er hat aus Bond, der auf dem Weg war, ein Dummy zu werden, wieder eine Figur gemacht. James Bond ist noch ein unbeschriebenes Blatt beim MI6. Solange 's name is never mentioned in the film. So etwas hatten nicht nur die Bondfans noch nie gesehen. James Bond ist noch ein unbeschriebenes Blatt beim MI6. Vesper Lynd ist paradoxerweise emanzipierter als eigentlich alle Kino-Bond-Girls bis in die Gegenwart.

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Bei der Arbeit mit Arnold versuchte er, alles Bond-Typische zu vermeiden. Auf diese Situation hat der britische Secret Service schon lange gewartet. This is the first time an image of the current Bond girl is used in the title sequence. Alle Rezensionen anzeigen. In this game, a hand with a pair of eights is called an "Octopussy". Have Your Say Bond's most serious love interest? Die verwendete Version ist der erstmals hier veröffentlichte Pop Mix. Die meiste Zeit nahmen daraufhin digitale Effekte ein, die eigentlichen Texte kamen ganz zum Schluss. Mal sehen, was das Mainstream-Publikum, welches nur den Kinobond kennt, dazu sagen wird. Pappa ante portas Preisleistung also voll in Ordnung. Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel. Sehr gut erhalten, Werktage Lieferzeit. Coole action, kann man immer wieder anschauen finde ich. The title song, " You Know My Name ", does not include the title of the film anywhere in the lyrics. Alles sieht danach aus, dass die Bondmacher wieder an einem Neuanfang arbeiten müssen - 10 Jahre, nachdem Casino Royale das Bonduniversum revitalisierte. Fleming geht mehrfach auf dessen prägende Kriegserlebnisse ein. Alles über den Film: DVD Mai 15, "Bitte wiederholen". Alle Rezensionen anzeigen. Alarm für Cobra 11 Gutes Bild und Sound, gute Filmlänge und eine wirklich gute Darstellung schieben diesen Film auch als Actionfilm ganz nach vorne! Coole action, kann man immer wieder anschauen finde ich. Navigation Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel.

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